Browse Exhibits (33 total)

Rising Time: Artifacts from the Reher Center for Immigrant Culture and History

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In “Rising Time,” the Reher Center for Immigrant Culture and History presents artifacts collected from one building to tell twin stories of continuity and change in Kingston’s Rondout community between the 1870s and 2004. The exhibit marks the culmination of a major project taken place during the summer of 2017, to research and catalog the Reher Center’s collection of over 5,000 artifacts. This research was an integral step toward the Center’s eventual goal of converting the historic site into an immersive site-specific museum. 

Ruth Lynda Deyo

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Ruth Lynda Deyo was a pianist, composer, intellectual, international traveler, lecturer, and artist drawn to mysticism and the occult. This exhibit highlights Historic Huguenot Street’s Ruth Lynda Deyo collection, comprising nine items ranging from 1904 to 1937.

Storied Objects: a material history of New Paltz

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This exhibition brings together a collection of artifacts, tools, knick-knacks, books, clothing, and other items that collectively tell the stories of New Paltz, New York.

Tales of a Congregation: African American History through the Lens of the AME Zion Church of New Paltz, NY

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This exhibit chronicles the birth of the New Paltz AME Zion Church from 1871 to its slow decline circa 1915. Using various primary sources, the exhibit highlights the many obstacles the African American Community would face in the church’s 45 years of existence.

The Early Ulster County Fair

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Today, we celebrate the Ulster County Fair in New Paltz, and some of us remember the years prior to 1967 when the fair was held in Kingston. But many do not know that the fair originated in Ellenville, and was held there from 1886 until 1931. This exhibit includes a sampling of photographs from those early years in order to provide you with a taste of a bygone era in which the county fair was a community's social event of the year.

The Hasbroucks of Locust Lawn: A lens into the history of a 19th century Hudson Valley family

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Using photographs, letters and other archival materials, this exhibit tells the story of a talented and energetic family whose history goes back to the earliest days of settlement in New Paltz. It offers viewers a glimpse of the family’s personal documents, clothing, artwork, handiwork, and much more. These personal and documented possessions belonged to real people who lived locally, and are treasures that tell us the story of a mid-19th century Hudson Valley family.

The Life and Death of Leah Catharine Deyo Jessup

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Leah Catharine Deyo was born in New Paltz, NY in 1818 and resided in the Hudson Valley until her death in 1849. John and Katia Jacobs, descendants of Leah Catharine preserved a collection of her correspondence, daguerreotypes, clothing and photographs. They generously donated it to the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at the Elting Library in the 1980s. This exhibit chronicles different aspects of Leah Catharine's life and offers a glimpse into the daily life of a mid-nineteenth century woman.

The Missing Chapter: Untold Stories of the African American Presence in the Mid-Hudson Valley

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This online exhibit contains images of historic documents and descriptive text concerning the African American presence in the Mid-Hudson Valley. Images include historic photographs, bills of sale, last wills of testament, estate inventories, runaway slave notices, court cases, slave laws, journals, ledgers, and correspondences.

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The Quilts of Historic Huguenot Street

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This exhibit features quilts, created using a variety of quilting techniques, from the collection at Historic Huguenot Street.

The School Letters of Rachel Eltinge, 1863-1865

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Rachel Eltinge, born in 1847 in New Paltz, NY, began attending the Poughkeepsie Female Academy in 1863. During her stay at the Academy she wrote numerous letters to her friends and family, describing everything from mundane daily tasks to important local events. The information exchanged between Rachel and the people most dear to her reveal the simple yet fascinating aspects of living in a time so different from our own.

This exhibit not only features Rachel Eltinge’s correspondences but also family photographs and genealogy, giving both clarity and life to words on paper.The letters and images found in this exhibit were generously donated to Historic Huguenot Street by Helena LeFevre.